It’s Story Time!

516137066-magic-book-with-shining-lights-gettyimages

Image from iStock. Credit Romolo Tavani

As you probably know, on the 2nd March it will be World Book Day. Not only that, but it is in fact the 20th year of World Book Day! So, in preparation for the big day, I have been thinking of some story and book based activities and experiences.

Create a Reading-Nook

There’s nothing better than a little cosy space to get lost in a book. Why not move some furniture, lay a blanket, build a pillow fort, or just grab loads of cushions to make a really appealing space for the children to read?  You could even try making it dark, adding a few fairy lights for that magical touch! Just remember – you don’t want the children to strain their eyes, so try providing some torches or small (safe) lamps for them to use.

Read Together

This may sound obvious but it’s SO valuable and important to children. I wrote about some ideas for making story time engaging in THIS previous post – take a look!

Get Creative

Do your children have a favourite book? Why not help them to make a new book cover? You can approach this in lots of different ways (draw it/ paint it/ use ICT/ act it out and take photos…) and can use these activities to develop plenty of skills. This can also spark discussion about the key features of a book cover (title, author, picture) as well as about the story itself.

474718926-meadow-river-bridge-trees-in-pages-open-book-gettyimages

Image from iStock. Credit: Orensila

Take a Trip

Why not go for a walk over to the local library or even the local bookshop? Choosing a new book can be so exciting for children, and it can even help to encourage those reluctant readers. Some libraries offer story sessions and other activities, it might be worth your while doing a little research!

 

I hope you have a brilliant Book Day! I look forward to seeing some fabulous activities and inspired costumes – please share! Tweet me: @EarlyYearsIdeas

 

signature

Advertisements

We’re going on a Maths Hunt!

During one of my university inputs, I was asked to look at a picture book and to consider how it could be used to develop children’s early mathematical skills.

The picture book that I chose was ‘We’re going on a Bear Hunt‘ by Michael Rosen. I chose this book because it’s one of my favourites, and one which (in my experience) never fails to capture children’s imagination.

I have used this story to explore language, and for various dramatic and creative play experiences, but I have never before taken a particular focus on the mathematical element. That being said, it is obvious that there is plenty of mathematical language and concepts throughout. Here are some of the ones that I spotted:

  • language of measurement and size: “we’re going to catch a BIG one” and “long, wavy grass”
  • positional language – over/ under/ through
  • counting – “one shiny, wet nose, 2 big furry ears…”
  • rhythm and repetition

If I were to use this story with my class, there are various activities which I may use to focus in on some of these concepts. I would always begin by reading the story with my class. I love the actions which Michael Rosen uses in his reading and would use the same, or my own variation of these to engage the children.

I have chosen 2 mathematical concepts to explore further: measurement and counting.

Measurement

To continue with the concept of measurement and size, I would encourage the children to explore tape-measures, rulers, measuring sticks and even non conventional measurement resources like lego blocks. I would then provide opportunities for the children to begin to sort items that they had measured into groups of big/ medium/ small etc. I would model and encourage the different words and language which can be used to describe these measurements: large, tiny, huge, little…

Another fun activity could be to have the children arrange themselves in a long line from biggest to smallest or visa versa. This activity could be done as a transition (for example when lining up for lunch) and would help to secure the children’s understanding.

Counting

163568_460302010707036_766482142_nOne way to continue learning about counting and labelling, in the way that the story does, could be to use the same method to describe something else. I would provide playdough with a variety of materials such as googly eyes, straws, sequins, string, etc and allow the children to create their own creature. I would encourage them to make their creature as weird and wacky as they liked, because when they are finished I would ask them to describe it to their friend. This activity could be linked to learning about description, or could simply be about how many eyes/ ears/ noses etc that their creature has.

 

Do you have any other ideas as to how we could use this book to develop maths skills? Please drop me a comment!