My Pregnancy Story

This post has been a while coming! I’ve really debated about whether to write about my pregnancy on this blog, as its focus has always been about sharing ideas for play and learning, but after some serious thought, I have decided that this is a big part of my life that will inevitably change my experiences, my outlook, and potentially my practice as an EYP and a teacher.

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Image from pixabay.com

With that in mind, I have decided that I will post about my pregnancy alongside any other of my normal style posts (as and when I feel inspired!! I realise they’ve been lacking recently, but university has been busy!) These pregnancy posts will be organised under the category ‘pregnancy’ so that you can either find or avoid these as you choose!

So here it is! I am now 16 weeks along and continually fluctuating between being excited and completely terrified. So far I have been extremely lucky in that my pregnancy has been fairly drama-free. Morning sickness has been and gone (thank goodness!). My 16 week scan was a wonderful experiences (apart from having to wait for a really long time with a REALLY full bladder). I have loved sharing the news with family and friends, and am now counting down the days to my anomaly scan, at the beginning of December, where we are hoping to find out whether we’ll be having a little boy or little girl!

I hope that you will enjoy reading my little updates and I thank everyone who follows my blog for their continued support!

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A Halloween Song

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Halloween is coming! Why not add another song to your repertoire?

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the Haunted Mansion (to the tune of ‘Walking through the Jungle’)

Chorus:

In the Haunted Mansion (In the Haunted Mansion)

What do you see? (What do you see?)

Can you hear a noise? (Can you hear a noise?)

What could it be? (What could it be?)

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Image from pixabay.com

Verse:

I think I hear a Witch (hee hee hee hee hee!)

I think I hear a Witch (hee hee hee hee hee!)

I think I hear a Witch (hee hee hee hee hee!)

Looking for her tea (Looking for her tea)

 

 

Other Verses:

I think I hear a Ghost (wooooooooo!)…

I think I hear a zombie (grruuuuuu)…

I think I hear a werewolf (hooooooowwwl!)…

 

This song is based on the version of the song that I learned and use, however there are different versions (as with so many songs!) Feel free to adapt it to suit the tune that you know!

If you’re not sure of how this song goes – here’s a YouTube (by Barefoot Books) video of one version of the song:  https://youtu.be/plvY0quSyJg

 

Looking for more seasonal ideas? Why not take a read of my post Happy Halloween

Have a spook-tastic Halloween! Please do comment or tweet to me (@EarlyYearsIdeas) and let me know what you get up to!

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Easy Rainy Day Artwork

Summer is beginning! You know what that means right… rain! Well that has certainly been the case around here recently. But we wont let the rain dampen our spirits. Here is a really quick and easy way to make some rain drop artwork:

 

What you need:

  • Sugar paper (as big or small as you like, but preferably a light colour)
  • Felt tip pens/ crayons/ chalks in a variety of colours and sizes (thick/ thin)
  • Rain

What to do:

1. Hold your piece of sugar paper outside in the rain for a short time, until it is covered in rain spots.

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2. Use those multi-coloured felt-tips or whatever you have chosen to draw around the spots. This can really be done however the children like, they could draw around each dot just once, or many times, making the circles bigger each time. They could create a pattern of colours, or just be totally random.

There is also a nice link to be made here with grouping. You could ask the children to circle the dots in groups of 2’s, 3’s etc!

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OK, I’m not going to lie – this isn’t the best version of what this wonderfully creative activity can produce. That’s because it’s my own example (and I have a serious lack of fun pens) but you get the idea.

 

What other pieces of art can we use the weather to create? Comment below or tweet to me @EarlyYearsIdeas – I’d love to hear from you!

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10 fantastic ways to have fun in the rain

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Living in the UK, there’s no escaping the rain – even during the summer!

But does that mean we need to stay cooped up indoors? NO! Unless it is torrential or in some way dangerous, there is no reason that we can’t go out to play. Here are some simple play ideas for a rainy day:

  1. Puddle Splashing: 

    Take a leaf from Peppa Pig’s book and jump in those muddle puddles. After getting nice and soggy, try stomping on some large paper to see the footprint patterns. Don’t forget wellies and wet suits!

  2. Making potions: 

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    Image from pixabay.com

    Rain water can used to make some exciting potions – add leaves, petals, mud, grass, anything else that can be found in the garden. This activity can be great for learning about measurement – using measuring jugs, containers and funnels to scoop and pour the liquid; counting – how many leaves/ petals shall we add?; and motor skills – as the children chop up the ingredients and use a spoon to mix them all together.

  3. Listening to sounds: 

    There’s something soothing about the sound of rain falling. Why not find a quiet spot and encourage the children to listen? In our busy lives, it’s an important skill to be able to take time to be quiet.

  4. Making sounds: 

    On the other hand, children love to be noisy! Baking trays and metal pots and pans outside can make a brilliant sound as the rain hits them.

  5. Collecting water:

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    Image from pixabay.com

    Ask the children to decide which containers they think will catch the rain. Will a cardboard box work? Why? Teach the children about volume by using different sizes and shapes of containers. It might also be interesting to put the containers in different places (under a tree, on top of the shed roof…) to find out if one place collects more water than another.

  6. Rainy art:

    Playground chalk looks great on a wet surface! Another way to create art is to use powder-paint and allow the raindrops to mix.

  7. Finding shelter: 

    Are there any places in the garden that have stayed dry? Maybe we can build a dry den? What materials should we use? Den building can develop lots of important skills such as team-work, and problem solving.

  8. Bike wash:

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    Image from pixabay.com

     Are those bikes looking a bit muddy? Use the rain as an opportunity to get out the sponges and cloths, and make your own bike-wash!

  9. Make some ripples: 

    Allow the children to see how the rain drops create ripples in the puddles and then explore making your own – using pebbles. What happens when we throw a big/ small pebble? Can we throw more than one at a time? What shapes and patterns can we see?

  10. Small world play: 

    Bring out some toy cars and trucks/ plastic animals/ dolls and let the children enjoy some imaginative play.

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Image from pixabay.com

 

As you can see, there are loads of way to have fun outside in the rain! If you have any more ideas, share them in the comments or tweet to me @EarlyYearsIdeas!

Have a great week!

 

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PedagooPerth CPD

Last Wednesday I was lucky enough to attend PedagooPerth – an event where teachers and education professionals from around the area come together and take part in learning conversations.

 

I joined in with 3 conversations:

  1. The wonderful world of lego – how lego can be used to develop a range of skills in primary children.
  2. How can we develop education outdoors within our community?
  3. Music in the primary classroom.

I chose these conversations because

a) I’ve always been a lover of lego and I was looking for ideas as to how I can bring that fun and engaging resource into my lessons at school,

b) Outdoor learning is one of my big passions and I was interested to see how it can be implemented effectively within a primary school,

c) My next university placement (‘learning from life’) is music based and I was hoping to gain some ideas and inspiration for this.

 

The Wonderful World of Lego

This first conversation provided me with loads of ideas that I would like to incorporate into my future practice. One of these ideas was using lego challenges as a soft start activity. These can vary in complexity and can encourage creativity, for example: a challenge can be as simple as ‘build a car’ or as tricky as ‘build a nightmare’. HERE is a blog with an example of some lego challenge cards.

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Image from morguefile.com

I also learned about a kit that schools can acquire which links lego with technology and ICT. These kits include the pieces and instructions needed to build a robot. Once the model is made, children are required to use simple coding in order to make the robot move. Children can then use these robots to enter into a competition known as the First Lego League. It was easy to see all of the various learning and skills which the children can gain through these experiences; from problem solving and teamwork, to the mathematical and computer skills involved in coding.

During this talk, the leader also spoke about the lego club at her school. This club was completely run and managed by the children themselves, and was used to allow the children to build, code, and try out techniques to allow them to score points for the competitions. I really like this idea and would love to see something similar in practice. This might even be something that I look into setting up in the future.

How can we develop education outdoors within our community?

This talk was really interesting as we were able to hear about how a primary school was developing their outdoor area and small patch of woodland to not only allow the classes to use it for learning, but also to encourage the local community to get involved.

The project was being run in a way that the children were given ownership, involving them in all stages of planning and even allowing them to help with the practical development i.e. digging up the ground for a path! We discussed all of the brilliant learning that can take place with a project like this, such as budgeting (as the children were helping to decide what was going to go into the wooded area). We also were able to hear about the future plans, such as allowing each class to keep an allotment within the woods, and using this for enterprise as the children could sell on the produce.

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Image from Morguefile.com

I was particularly interested to hear that, as the site is community owned, the plan was for the community to take an active role in using and maintaining it. This would mean that the area would be open to families, even when the school was closed (for example during the summer holidays).

Alongside all the positives of this project, there are also barriers and challenges which must be overcome. One of these challenges is that in the past, the area has been subject to littering and vandalism. It is hoped that as the site is improved, and everyone is involved in its development, this will deter such activities. Another challenge is ensuring the sustainability and minimising the negative impacts of human activity on the trees and the wildlife. Rangers and the Forestry commission can be used for this purpose, for example conducting a tree survey, however it is important that staff, pupils, and the community are educated and made aware of what they must do to look after the environment.

This talk left me enthusiastic and feeling positive that forest school and outdoor learning can take place effectively within primary schools. Obviously, this is easier for those schools which are lucky enough to have a natural outdoor area which they can use (rather than a concrete playground), however I am confident that all schools can find a way to incorporate more of this valuable learning.

Music in the Primary Classroom

This conversation included lots of really practical ideas on how to teach music to primary school students. I was able to see how children could learn rhythms and patterns using their bodies, or spots on the floor, and how this would link with eventually reading written sheet music.

I was also able to make connections between the learning ideas presented, and the methods that I observed and have read about for my learning from life placement. This style did not use figurenotes, however the progression was very similar, and it was obvious that there was very positive results.

I particularly liked the idea of a noise pyramid activity which involves children making individual sounds, but being brought in, and brought off at different times so that the sounds build up in layers. I feel that this has clear links with helping children to understand written music notation.

While I have always been fairly keen and confident in using music within the early years, this talk has provided me with lots of ideas which I feel I can bring into my practice, both within my next university placement, and throughout my future teaching career. It has helped me to feel more confident about teaching music to primary children.

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Overall, I feel that PedagooPerth was a really worthwhile event. I was able to meet with some really interesting and incredibly friendly people and I learned a lot too! If you have to opportunity to attend one of these in the future, I would highly recommend it.

Twitter Chat Update

In an effort to ensure that our weekly #EYshare’s are relevant and engaging, I have created a board where people can post their own ideas/ suggestions for future chats. This board is open to all and does not require a subscription so I do hope that it will be used!

Here is the padlet board:

Made with Padlet

As this post will (obviously) move down and become less visible, the board will also be accessible through the ‘Twitter’ page (see top menu).

This is a little bit experimental so let’s see if it works! Thanks everyone!

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It’s Story Time!

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Image from iStock. Credit Romolo Tavani

As you probably know, on the 2nd March it will be World Book Day. Not only that, but it is in fact the 20th year of World Book Day! So, in preparation for the big day, I have been thinking of some story and book based activities and experiences.

Create a Reading-Nook

There’s nothing better than a little cosy space to get lost in a book. Why not move some furniture, lay a blanket, build a pillow fort, or just grab loads of cushions to make a really appealing space for the children to read?  You could even try making it dark, adding a few fairy lights for that magical touch! Just remember – you don’t want the children to strain their eyes, so try providing some torches or small (safe) lamps for them to use.

Read Together

This may sound obvious but it’s SO valuable and important to children. I wrote about some ideas for making story time engaging in THIS previous post – take a look!

Get Creative

Do your children have a favourite book? Why not help them to make a new book cover? You can approach this in lots of different ways (draw it/ paint it/ use ICT/ act it out and take photos…) and can use these activities to develop plenty of skills. This can also spark discussion about the key features of a book cover (title, author, picture) as well as about the story itself.

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Image from iStock. Credit: Orensila

Take a Trip

Why not go for a walk over to the local library or even the local bookshop? Choosing a new book can be so exciting for children, and it can even help to encourage those reluctant readers. Some libraries offer story sessions and other activities, it might be worth your while doing a little research!

 

I hope you have a brilliant Book Day! I look forward to seeing some fabulous activities and inspired costumes – please share! Tweet me: @EarlyYearsIdeas

 

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